“Heretics and Schismatics”

I was chastised on another blog for saying that Pope Benedict XVI and the Catholic Church view Protestants as “heretics and schismatics” in my post on the recent CDF document.

Well, here’s a point no one in the media or in the ecumenical world has paid attention to.  That phrase, “heretics and schismatics,” comes from the Good Friday prayers of the 1962 Missale Romanum, the use of which was liberalized this week by Pope Benedict XVI.

1) For the unity of the Church. Let us pray also for heretics and schismatics, that our Lord and God may save them from their errors and be pleased to recall them to our holy Mother the Catholic and Apostolic Church.

5 thoughts on ““Heretics and Schismatics”

  1. Ah, but during the Triduum, the liturgy in Latin won’t be used, unless that is the language normally used for that parish.

    It’s a small point, but I thought it was pertinent. The Latin missal can be used, but not to the exclusion of the vernacular where there is only one, or only one significant liturgy for the day, as with the Triduum.

    It seemed to be a way to compromise, without actually modifying the older liturgy.

  2. First, Latin can be used anywhere, anytime, and this has always been possible. Triduum is celebrated in Latin in places and it will continue to be–as it always has been at St. Peter’s. According to the 1970 Missal.

    Second, this permission was not for the Latin language, it was for the 1962 Missal. That’s the term you have to use to distinguish between the two–which missal, not the language.Though the Triduum will not ordinarily be celebrated according to the 1962 Missal, it will be done in personal parishes that may be erected by the Bishop (as it is done in some such today).

    The point that Benedict XVI made was that the 1962 liturgy–including the Good Friday prayers–was never abrogated.

  3. “Though the Triduum will not ordinarily be celebrated according to the 1962 Missal, it will be done in personal parishes that may be erected by the Bishop (as it is done in some such today).”

    Maybe I missed something, Bill, but the only mention of personal parishes is in Article 10, which simply refers to the existing provision (Canon 518) for non-territorial parishes, and states that these bishop in establishing such a parish must follow “all norms of law”. A personal parish as such would not appear to have an exemption from Article 2.

    As for any religious community erected strictly for celebrations according to the 1962 missal, I would want to see just what the rules have been for that small group of communities. I do know that even they cannot escape the requirement for attendance at the Chrism Mass, which is definitely celebrated according to the 1970/2000 missal.

    It is clear, though, that there is no authorization for use of the 1962 Good Friday liturgy outside of that possible loophole. For any diocesan (and probably all religious) priests, using that liturgy is Right Out.

  4. Yes, they would have to celebrate the Chrism mass. That’s the existing norm for the Fraternity of St. Peter. Yes, they would use the 1962 Missal for Triduum, as is done in existing “indult” parishes. This doesn’t change any of that.

    Point is–the 1962 Missal wasn’t abrogated. That’s what the pope said. That means all the language in it is still valid–and it is prayer that drives theology. Lex orandi, lex credendi.

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